Mindful Photography

November 19, 2016  •  Leave a Comment

I've decided to reboot my blog -just because.

 

It has been ten years since I retired from full-time professional photography. That anniversary has led to some reflection on my part.

 

During my employment as a professional, I carried on with a certain amount of personal work. That work was influenced by the constraints under which I worked as a professional. I did large volumes of technical and documentary work for which personal interpretation was inappropriate. On my own time I did produce a number of pictures that would not look out of place with my current work, but did not do so consistently.

 

After retirement I was able to return fully to something that was part of my early involvement in photography, that being a practice now called mindfulness.

 

While working in the Arctic in 1971 I had an experience that left me aware of the vastness and mystery of our universe in a very powerful way. My northern time in 1971/1972 left me with a determination to live in the north and be a photographer.

 

Arctic Midnight. 1971.Arctic Midnight. 1971.

Arctic Midnight. 1971.

 

Over the next several years I discovered photographers such as Edward Weston, Minor White and Ansel Adams whose work made me aware of the expressive potential of photography. Coincidentally I briefly studied some meditative techniques. It turned out that I could rather easily slip in to a different perceptive mode that worked well for some types of photography.

 

While pursuing my reflections about the past 10 years, today I came across an online book, Photographic Psychology: Image and Psyche, by John Suler. The section titled Mindfulness in Photography is a remarkably accurate description of my current practice.

 

I've dipped in to other parts of the book, and intend to read it thoroughly.

 

 


Comments

No comments posted.
Loading...

Subscribe
RSS
Keywords
mindfulness prints
Archive
January February March April May June July August September October November (2) December
January February March April May June July August September October November December